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At the APWA in Tuscon last month, Joe Soto, Public Works Manager at Pima County won a Scholarship to IPMA™ Academy!

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From the Desk of Blair Barnhardt

“An Open Letter to Public Works Agencies & Pavement Managers”

I would like to make a HUGE announcement! The Barnhardt Group, LLC has become one of the “handful” of Pavement Management Professionals to become P-TAP Pre-Qualified by the MTC (Metropolitan Transportation Commission) in the USA.
This is a great accomplishment by myself and Jason Spencer, APM (Operations Manager at the Barnhardt Group).

What is P-TAP? – PAVEMENT MANAGEMENT TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

Established in 1999, P-TAP provides consultant services to help local jurisdictions better manage and maintain their streets and roads using a PMS. P-TAP’s initial objective was to assist small to medium-sized jurisdictions since many of those jurisdictions were not able to implement and maintain a PMS because of limited financial resources, staff inexperience due to turnover, and a lack of staff time necessary to start up the program. The early P-TAP funding rounds effectively addressed those needs and, for subsequent funding rounds, eligibility was expanded to include larger cities and counties to assist these jurisdictions with specific components of their PMS.

Passing Criteria?

To pass the pre-qualification test, consultants must meet the following two criteria on distress data:

At least 50 percent of the PCI values for the inspected sections must be within +/- 5 PCI points of the reference, or “ground truth,” PCI values.
No more than 12 percent of the PCI values for the inspected sections can be greater than +/- 15 PCI points of the reference, or “ground truth,” PCI values.

Pretty rigorous, huh? Well we did it and it is time to create or update YOUR Pavement Management Plan with StreetSaver!

For the 1st person that calls us at 404-953-0131 or emails us at lori@thebarnhardtgroup.com, we will discount our services by 30% for a full “brand new” implementation. For an update of your network of roads, we are offering a 50% discount to the first person to call. Contract must be executed by 10/15/2016. If you are in Arizona, this is easy as we have a Co-Op clause in effect with Kingman, AZ which allows your agency to “bolt-on” to that contract and not jump through the hoops of a formal RFP process.

We need to fill a gap in November and this is what we are offering:

SCOPE OF WORK

This will better identify the services to the Agency:

PRELIMINARY SCOPE OF WORK UPDATE OR IMPLEMENTATION OF PAVEMENT MANAGEMENT PROGRAM

The Scope of Work may include, but will not be limited to the following items listed below. The consultant should revise and/or expand on this scope in accordance with their expertise.

Task I Data Gathering

1. Kick Off Meeting

The consultant will meet with the City/County to finalize the schedule and initiate the project. The City/County will provide a copy of the current database. StreetSaver or MicroPAVER will be set-up w/2 seats for City/County officials. During the meeting the Consultant will spend several hours going over their Standard Operating Procedures for data collection and their overall pavement management strategy. At this time the Consultant will verify which steps to take if they find that the original data collected is erroneous in any way. A good amount of time will also be spent during this meeting to correlate and cross check items such as overall areas, square yardages etc. i.e. for residential neighbor hoods, does the pavement in the decal and acceleration lanes ‘belong’ to the main road or the neighborhood? Other items for discussion maybe how and how often will TBG Top 10 List be transmitted to the Agency staff. At this time we also like to get a one-page letter on Agency letterhead that explains what our TBG crews are doing in the field. This way if anyone asks what we are doing, we can quickly and efficiently hand the person asking a copy of your Agency letter so we are delivering a consistent message to the residents.

2. As-built Research

The consultant shall research and obtain as-builts for all street repair and maintenance projects that the City/County has performed since the last update to the City/County’s database. The Consultant will spend a good amount of time investigating with the City/County staff to obtain this information. Where this is information is not available the TBG staff can obtain it by back calculation in the field based on their pavement management expertise. While the original construction date is always important, nothing is more

important than an accurate depiction of the last M & R (Major Rehabilitation) date. The TBG crews routinely capture this information on foot during their surveys by back calculation from the date printed on the fire hydrants and determining if the road has been sequentially overlaid or inlaid since it’s original back calculated construction date.

Task II Field Inspection

1. Field Review

The consultant shall field review the various streets and street segments in the database and prepare a Pavement Condition Index (PCI) for each segment. Streets that have been recently repaired should be inspected but may not require PCI calculations. The consultant should detail their proposed method for PCI calculations. The number or percentage of street segments that are to be inspected shall be clearly identified in the proposal.

The Consultant (TBG) plans to perform ASTM 6433 pavement distress survey on the entire network of approximately 1740 center lane miles of roadway for the City/County. If the actual center lane miles are slightly more no additional charges will be incurred. If the center lane miles are considerably more than what has been reported in the answers to the questions on the City/County website, then a pro rated amount of time can be applied to compensate the Consultant. In order for TBG to provide the most value in this response and contract, it is imperative that each and every street be surveyed for pavement distress, lengths, widths and areas will be verified for accuracy, and PCI Ratings will be calculated for each segment. The City/County and TBG may decide to group multiple sections together into larger sections for the ease of managing their pavement at this time. However, this would be decided only through collaboration and agreement by both parties that this is mutually beneficial to both.

The Consultant shall obtain accurate distances using a Distance Measuring Device (DMI) such as the Jamar RAC 100 or similar that is calibrated and hooked into the drive mechanism of the vehicle hosting the apparatus. Widths shall be accurately calibrated as well. On roads with multiple and various widths and odd sizes (i.e. roundabouts) the Consultant shall perform an accurate digital take off using a software such as http://www.goipave.com to obtain the overall square yardages required for the field survey.

At this time the Consultant shall also employ network level coring where the pavement section thickness is not apparent from visual inspection. This core drill to be used will be a Hilti DD 130 or equivalent. Where the depth of pavement is visible or the Consultant is certain of its make up and structure without coring, that shall be sufficient in lieu of physical coring. Note that the network level coring is not part of ASTM 6433 and is used to accurately align the proper rehabilitation techniques at the project level. The network level coring is not meant to be a replacement for

project level coring. The coring may be waived by the Agency if not required by them. No deduction in payment will be required by the Consultant should the Agency decide to forgo network level coring.

The Consultant shall survey and collect all of the 20 distresses from the MicroPAVER Distress Identification Manual for Asphalt Roads and Parking Lots and all 19 of the distresses for the MicroPAVER Distress Identification Manual for Concrete Roads and Parking Lots.

Should the quantities of center lane miles vary by more than 3% of the original estimate of center lane miles given by the Agency at the time of the contract, the Agency and Consultant will mutually agree on a prorated amount of money for the additional work required if this project is awarded based on a unit price per center lane mile.

2. Field Data Report

The consultant shall prepare a report of the field inspection data. The Consultant will also provide a live meeting to explain their findings from the Field Review above. During this meeting the City/County will be apprised of how accurate their original data is in terms of quantities of pavement area etc.

Task III Update Data Base

1. Data Entry

The consultant shall enter the results of the field inspection into the MicroPAVER or StreetSaver Database. The consultant shall compare the new data with the existing data to determine if any street segments appear to be subject to accelerated deterioration.

The Consultant will also determine if there was any erroneous data entry from the previous surveys at this time based on the correlation between the most recent Field Review and their pavement management expertise.

2. Analysis

The consultant shall prepare the StreetSaver or MicroPAVER analysis and provide a report indicating the Pavement Condition Index for the individual segments. The consultant shall compare the StreetSaver or MicroPAVER output with the Field Data Report to insure that the resulting PCIs accurately reflect the existing pavement condition.

The Consultant will also update unit prices and desired treatments that the City/County is or wishes to use in the future in order that accurate budget forecasting can be delivered. The Consultant will also advise and make recommendations on all treatments that are currently available in the the region and provide guidance on to what benefits and what drawbacks are associated with each and every preservation, and rehabilitation treatments are available.

Task IV Prioritization

1. Priority Projects

The consultant shall review the citywide data and make recommendations for repair projects on streets where unusual or accelerated pavement damage has occurred or for other pavement conditions that may adversely effect public safety. The Consultant will also explain the benefits of not treating all of the worst first roads with their limited budget. This can be accomplished by live classroom training (some of which is included in this response pro bono) and online pavement management training through IPMA Academy (2 scholarships are available as part of this proposed scope of work).

2. Five-Year Management and Financial Plan

The consultant shall develop a Five-Year Pavement Management Plan. The plan shall seek to maximize the life and condition of City/County streets given a limited pavement maintenance budget. The management plan shall include estimated costs for the work in each year. The Five-Year Management and Financial Plan shall have two different scenarios to reflect possible funding levels.

The Consultant may also elect to perform an unconstrained budget to determine the overall amount that is actually required to get the network to optimum over a fixed period of time. The Consultant fees for this project would remain the same regardless of the software chosen by the City/County.

3. Alternative Scenarios

In addition to the Five-Year Management and Financial Plan, the consultant shall also prepare two additional scenarios. Although not defined at this time, one possible scenario could to increase the PCI to a certain level. In order to prepare the proposal, assume that the effort level for the two alternative scenarios would be similar to preparing an alternate funding level for the Five-Year Management and Financial Plan.

The Consultant will work in collaboration with the City/County to find the best-case alternate scenarios. Often target based scenarios work well to highlight deficiencies in budgets, and the associated ‘what if’ scenarios that take place hypothetically when funding levels change. With Target driven scenarios the politicians can quickly see how much extra funding will be required to get to a desired level of service with their roadway network based on a specific PCI rating.

Task V Final Report

1. Final Report

The consultant shall prepare a final report containing: a description of the methodology used in the analysis, the priority project listing, the two Five Year Management and Financial Plans, the PCI output listing and the two alternative scenarios.

The Consultant will also provide a non-technical video (10-15 minutes) that gives the City/County a good understanding of their current condition of roadway network and the funding required for maintaining it or improving it. The Consultant will also supply a dry erase calendar style roll up whiteboard with a complete listing of all the roadways and their current PCI index.

I have numerous sample final reports and testimonials that I can send upon request.

Do not pass this up!

It is imperative that the rating inspectors get this right from day one. Further, we noticed that there are many, many, many small sections. Typically this is one of the biggest complaints that we receive in feedback sessions from our conversion clients as they discuss their dismay in the original set up by others.

Boy does a City on MO and a Village in Illinois know that…but that is in the next open letter…stay tuned…this is a “doozie”. Below is a hint.

Blair

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And do not forget the FREE BOOK:
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Your IPMA™ Tip of the Week LIVE FROM St. Charles, MO

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Your IPMA™ Tip of the Week
LIVE FROM St. Charles, MO

You know, a lot of folks are starting to get excited about pavement management and rightfully so.

Be forewarned however that not all consultants out there providing these services are delivering all that they promise.

Recall that Scott McDonald and I did a podcast session on Better Roads Radio a while back, here is the link http://ipma.co/betterroadsradio/2014/01/16/episode-3-the-one-where-blair-corners-scott-mcdonald-ipma-advisory-board-member-and-paver-guru/ where we discussed the key essentials in setting up your data base.

Well, apparently there are still firms out there, buzzing around collecting data all over the country that pay little if any heed to the last M and R date or pavement section type for that matter.

Then, as you may have guessed our team swoops in and helps aid the agencies in fixing all the corrupted data that is input into the PAVER™ data base for your agency. (BTW, the same stuff likely happens with other software programs out there).

If your city or county is interested in setting up a pavement management program, and I don’t see why you wouldn’t be, take a look at this short video to learn the key essentials to pavement management basics SO THAT YOU DON”T HAVE TO ENDURE THE PAIN OF FIXING EVERYTHING at a later date.

Hope that didn’t offend anyone LOL.
Best, Blair

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Do Not Forget the FREE BOOK!

Final Days | Pavement Management Training

You can do this!

Thanks to those that have signed up for the BOGO event, we love you.

For all the others, we can’t figure out why you are not taking advantage of this amazing offer!

And here is the mp3 audio for the Pavement Management Primer…enjoy!

Get Back to School at our BEST PRICE EVER!

Wellington Kansas PM

Wellington Kansas PM

For the life of me, I can’t imagine why every city and county in America, or the world for that matter are not all managing their pavements.

At the bare minimum at least grab a copy of my Amazon #1 Best Seller, The Book on Better Roads, Saving YOUR Crumbling Roads with Practical Pavement Management!

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Geez, I mean it is free…. you can grab it at http://www.blairbarnhardt.com.

You see, it costs about 2 or 3 cents per square yard to set up a brand new pavement management system with boots on the ground rating and expert inventory!

Your jurisdiction will go on to save 10 bucks a square yard every time, literally saving millions each calendar year by doing the right treatment on the right road at the right time with the right contractor and for the right reason! You can thank us later, now sit back and enjoy the video!

Be sure to LIKE and Share all over social media!!!! If 50 cities or counties in 50 states would do this in 2016, we could save this great country 2.5 BILLION DOLLARS and have better roads for everybody for less money and less carbon footprint!

PS Heed the Naysayers, this Great Country has a bunch of folks that would LOVE to continue rehabilitating this Country’s 4 million miles of roads the exact same way they did it in 1956 while they order up their private jets on their iPhone apps… there I said it. We can make our crumbling roads GREAT AGAIN!!!! Blair : )

Now GO GET THIS DEAL HERE!

Practical Pavement Management for Local Agencies

Have you downloaded the Purdue e-Pub from Blair Barnhardt?

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Session Title

Practical Pavement Management for Local Agencies

Track Title

Pavement Management

Event Description/Abstract

During this presentation, attendees will learn
about best practices for pavement managers.
Whether you are setting up a pavement
management system (PMS) for the first time
and from ground zero, or you are a seasoned
pavement manager working with an existing
system, this presentation will provide you with
current, useful information that you will be able
to apply the moment you step back into your
office.

 

And Do Not Forget the FREE BOOK!

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Ha5 | Rocklin Installs High Density Mineral Bond | IPMA™ Charter Member

Written By: Joe Romer, RGS Inspector for City of Rocklin

Great Job Holbrook Asphalt…Blair

The City of Rocklin, always open to new products to maintain city streets and different strategies for pavement maintenance, applied High Density Mineral Bond (HDMB) treatment to residential streets this past summer. Richard Lawrence, Public Works Supervisor, became interested in HDMB after a webinar session on pavement maintenance products and applications. The City of Rocklin is no stranger to pavement maintenance projects. Slurry seal, crack sealing, micro surfacing and cape seals have been regular components of the city’s maintenance programs.

According to Mark Beatty, Senior Vice President at IPS / Holbrook Asphalt, “The City of Rocklin, was the first California agency to apply a new classification in pavement preser- vation known as a High Density Mineral Bond. With a 14-year performance history in other states, the product minimized any agency risk commonly associated with a first-time project. The surfacing couples a preservation treatment with a track record of performance with high aesthetics that residents embrace.”

Screen Shot 2016-06-14 at 6.29.19 PMFigure 1. HDMB Surfacing

HDMB has triggered intense interest and use nationally based solely upon its performance record. HDMB is a proprietary product of emulsion, polymer additives and very fine aggregates.

 

Screen Shot 2016-06-14 at 6.31.07 PMFigure 2. Spray Application of HDMB

It is spray-applied, similar to some seal coats, in a two application process. Rocklin’s research verified the performance history of HDMB. Over 200 million square feet have been installed throughout the U.S. The history of the product dates back to pilot installations in 2002.

It is a preservation treatment intended to keep good pavements in good condition by minimizing oxidative damage from moisture and from UV rays.

“Even though the application was new to California, we were anxious to get it on the ground because it had over a decade of prov- en performance,” stated Rocklin’s Richard Lawrence.

As Tregg Holbrook, founder and CEO of IPS / Holbrook Asphalt, puts it, “As we advised community leaders managing pavement assets, we would steer decision makers to treatments with a known level of functioning, such as slurry, micro surfacing, or chip seals. The feed- back from residents was that they were often displeased with these types of surface treatments after they were installed.

Screen Shot 2016-06-14 at 6.32.19 PMFigure 3. Valve Covers Masked Before Spray Application of HDMB

Suggesting that agencies use pavement sealers that are considered to have better aesthetics, such as fog seals or parking lot emulsion sealers, which both turn roads black and are believed to look good post-installation, was always an option, but the performance longevity was recognized as a considerable weakness.”

As the inspector on this project, and hearing of this product for the first time, there were many questions to be answered. For example; What is it? How is the product applied? How do you measure the application rate? What is the product supposed to look like after application?

After the first day of application, these questions were quickly answered. The “HA- 5” HDMB product was installed by Holbrook Asphalt in July, 2015, working as subcontractor to Sierra Nevada Construction. Dipping the tank on the spreader truck before and after solved the application rate question. The HDMB left the roads a deep black color. This product is applied in two applications per street, requiring a 24-hour closure for the applications to fully cure. Each application consisted of one spreader truck “cutting in the gutters” by hand wand and shield, and the second spreader truck spraying the streets with the spray bar. This procedure was repeated a second time, after the first application had time to break. The average total application rate was 0.35 gallons per square yard. Street closures were planned such that residents were able to park a short distance from their homes. Phone calls were minimal after the residents were able to see the finished product.

There were many lessons learned from this project. Interestingly, it was found that after the HDMB was installed, surface temperatures, anticipated to be higher due to the darker col- or alone, were actually 5 to 10 degrees cooler as compared to adjacent pavements that either had no previous treatment or that had a micro or slurry installed years earlier.

Screen Shot 2016-06-14 at 6.32.19 PMFigure 4. “Cutting in the Gutters” by hand wand and shield

 

 

 

 

 

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I-88 Rubberized Asphalt Project

Last year, Asphalt Plus conducted a trial project of dry process crumb rubber modified asphalt on Interstate 88 near Rochelle, Illinois. The project included the laboratory evaluation of two asphalt mix design and placement of two lane-miles of pavement on I-88.

The first mix was:

  • Friction SMA (ILDOT)
  • 34% ABR (5% RAS and 8 lbs of rubber mix per ton)
  • No RAS content

Tests suggest comparable Hamburg and DCT performance between dry process CRM asphalt and PMA.Screen Shot 2016-05-19 at 5.49.06 PM

  • 2 vs. 2.5 mm rut respectively
  • 602 vs. 566 DCT respectively

The second mix was:

  • 12.5 N75 Fine Surface Graded Mix (WIDOT)

Lab testing of the WIDOT mix with and without engineered dry process rubber showed the rubber additions significantly improved mix performance.

Presence of rubber improved:

  • Hamburg rutting from 8.2 mm at 10,000 passes to 3.4 mm at 20,000 passes
  • Increased DCT results from 358 to 482

Modifying The PlantScreen Shot 2016-05-19 at 5.49.15 PM

The Curran DeKalb plant was modified for dry process asphalt production in a matter of a few hours.

Using a loss-in-weight feeder system:

  • Engineered crumb rubber was injected into production with a high degree of accuracy
  • Plant production of CRM asphalt at full production rates occurred without interruption
  • Two mix designs were produced in sequence with minimal waste

The asphalt mixes were trucked 40 miles on a cool day (55 F at start), and placement temperatures ranged from 235 to 280 F off the trucks.

The Finished Product:

  • Finished without any tearing
  • Vibratory rollers produced specified compaction without special effort and without stopping plant operations

Performance evaluations will continue in the field following a winter of service. The existing record of technology field performance in colder climates strongly suggests that the use of dry process engineered rubberized asphalt mix designs will be permitted as a competitive alternative to other forms of modified asphalt. The cost advantage suggests this process will benefit both producers and road owners.

 

View full case study

From http://asphaltplus.com/rubberized-asphalt-trial-project/

And get the FREE BOOK!

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Pavement Managment | News to Use

City unveils Measure A spending plan

 

Screen Shot 2016-05-03 at 8.28.53 PMThe county of Santa Barbara Transportation Sales Tax, or Measure A, was passed by voters and is used to keep roads in the county well-maintained for vehicles and pedestrians. On Monday, the city of Santa Maria unveiled how it planned to spend its share of funds generated by Measure A for the next five years.

 

Since 2008, Santa Barbara County has imposed a one-half of a cent sales tax on purchases made in the county to fund transportation projects. Measure A was a continuation of an earlier program called Measure D, which was approved by voters in 1989.

The county collects the funds and, then, distributes them to all the incorporated municipalities to help fund their street maintenance programs.

 

“The distribution is based on population,” said Rodger Olds, Santa Maria’s senior civil engineer. “Santa Maria gets the lion’s share of the money.”

The total allocation for fiscal year 2016-17 is $5.1 million. The total allotment for fiscal year 2016-21 will be $26.2 million.

 

“Of that, we are required to spend 15 percent on alternative transportation expenditures,” Olds said.

The alternative expenditure projects include sidewalk and bicycle lane improvements.

Monday’s presentation only laid out the financial breakdown for the next five years; it did not list specific projects.

 

The city of Santa Maria relies on a computer program to create its paving plan.

“We have a pavement management program called Street Saver. It identifies what roadways need to be maintained and upgraded,” Olds said.

The computer application uses data it receives from city staff members.

“Street crews survey the roadways and give everyone a score. That gets entered into the program,” Olds explained.

 

City streets are also on a resurfacing schedule.

 

“We have been on a chip seal program for years. Every residential street is on a 10-year schedule. Most of our major roadways are on a seven-year schedule,” Olds said.

Chip seal is the process where a multiple layers of a binder is laid on the road surface, then covered with small stones that are rolled and embedded in the binder.

 

“It is a good preservative for roadways,” the city engineer added.

 

A few years ago, the city of Santa Maria used Measure A funds to replace every street light in the city with brighter LED lights.

 

“Some of the area lights in parking lots haven’t been fitted yet, but we are working on it. We are almost done,” Olds said.

 

The city of Santa Maria’s Public Works Department also recently embarked on a project to address Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) ramps on sidewalks at intersections in the city.

 

“We are close to getting intersections that don’t have any ramps done,” Olds said.

The Five Year Measure A Program of Projects will next go before the Santa Maria City Council during its May 17 meeting.

From:  https://santamariatimes.com/

Get the FREE “Book on Better Roads” at:

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