Flash Sale | 15 Hours on Pavement Management Training

Blair is going to kill me!

The Unreleased Black Album was selling SO fast!!  I panicked and ordered the 8 DVD Special instead of the Single DVD (yeah, and a whopping 200 pcs).

As you can guess, this pushed “BOSS MAN” over the edge due to the HUGE inventory cost differential. 😦

This one is normally $400 BUCKS!

Just give me the cost back and he might keep me around.

CLICK HERE to have it delivered for $90.91!!! (I am paying your shipping in the US, for sure!)

THEY GOT TO GO!  I love my job!

(There is a bit of urgency here)

Here’s what’s inside:  Over 15 HOURS across 4 different states in countless INSIDER TIPS.  Since agency folks are not allowed to travel, we have produced amazing training sessions to view in the comfort of your office or home.

Guest speakers include the following:greatesthits-dvd-3d
Basem Muallem, PE
Brian Frix, EIT, APM
Dr. Mike Heitzman, PE
James Emerson, APM
Blair Barnhardt, APM
Kevin Donnelly, APM
Dr. Gary Hicks, PE
Miguel Valentin, PE, APM
Dave Fokken
Pat Faster
Rusty Smallwood
Mark Beatty

PS. The Greatest Box Set includes PDH Power Hour 01 as a special bonus.
As this deal is only good through my termination dat, take advantage now by ordering today!”

BUY ME

Howard Shieh, PE, APM emphatically states, “Blair’s training episodes and book really inspire me. His experience and enthusiasm with pavement management is remarkable!”

PLEASE BUY ME

I hope you take advantage of this great offer!

Best,

Lori
(404) 953-0131
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High-volume pavement preservation: Untapped potential for contractors

Re-Blogging from Better Roads Magazine

BY:  Chris Hill

|  February 15, 2016 |

Screen Shot 2016-02-15 at 7.17.10 PMAsphalt pavement preservation is a tactic used primarily in the realm of low-volume roadways. It has helped municipalities expand road life, keep overall highway maintenance costs down, and keep residents relatively happy during their commutes to and from work and home.

The success of these programs, along with interest from the Federal Highway Administration, is now pushing the paving industry to focus on pavement preservation for high-volume roadways.

The National Center for Asphalt Technology (NCAT) at Auburn University is leading the way, implementing pavement preservation test plots on U.S. 280 in central Alabama. The highway is a major artery into the metro Birmingham area. (See sidebar below, “High-volume preservation method testing.”)

NCAT directed placement of these plots last summer, collecting performance data such as roughness, rutting and cracking. In addition to collecting this data weekly, they are also studying more long-term performance metrics (such as field permeability) on a quarterly basis.

The test is designed to be a “rational starting point,” in order to narrow down which pavement preservation techniques are the optimal combination of life-cycle costs and performance. The secondary goal is to use the data gathered to create guide specifications, and to recommend guidelines for pavement quality assurance testing and inspection.

NCAT’s partner in road research, Minnesota Department of Transportation’s Minnesota Road Research Facility (MnROAD), is also testing some of the same pavement preservation treatments on high volume roadways in Minnesota’s cold-weather climate.

“Our goal is to execute a single experiment with nationwide impact through the MnROAD partnership,” says Buzz Powell, NCAT assistant director and test track manager. “This involves experiment design, construction planning, installation, performance testing, dissemination of findings, and (most importantly) implementation. It would be ideal for guidelines/specifications to be universal; however, best practices could vary as a function of climate, materials, etc.”

 

Municipal experience

Screen Shot 2016-02-15 at 7.17.00 PMThe Charleston County (South Carolina) Transportation Development department has been a model example of a municipality continually improving and expanding a preservation program. In honor of those achievements, For Pavement Preservation (FP2) awarded the agency its 2014 James B. Sorenson Award. FP2 lauded the agency for its work testing and implementing multiple preservation techniques, and for its communication efforts explaining the preservation work to the public.

Though more than 80 percent of the county’s preservation work takes place on low-volume roadways, according to Richard Turner, project and preservation program manager, one method stands out for its effectiveness on high-volume roadways: microsurfacing.

“We continue to run pilot projects trying different applications, and probably the most used is microsurfacing,” Turner says. “I’ve seen that successfully placed on high-volume roads here in Charleston, by us or by the South Carolina Department of Transportation (SCDOT), assuming it’s put on the right road at the right time. If you put a microsurfacing treatment down on a road that’s a little bit further into its life, the microsurfacing lifecyle won’t be as good as it would be if you applied the treatment earlier in its life.”

This technique is fairly new in the market for high-volume roads in South Carolina, with SCDOT using the technique for the first time seven years ago (on U.S. 17 in Charleston County). Turner says his agency’s first use of the technique was in 2011.

“We’re looking at a market that’s five to seven years old,” he says, adding that he hasn’t been able to work with contractors in South Carolina because there aren’t any doing the work. Instead, contractors from adjacent states are winning the contracts.

“The two or three companies that are bidding on projects throughout South Carolina are able to have a nomad crew that comes and spends 30 to 60 days in each county, get the work done and report back. I don’t know if there’s anyone in the state ready to invest yet or not.”

From Turner’s perspective, microsurfacing is a far better application for high-volume settings (compared to low-volume roads), a viewpoint that comes as a direct result of his agency’s communication efforts. It boils down to look and feel.

“When it’s placed on roads that are higher volume, we’ve gotten no complaints,” he says. “When we’ve placed it on lower volume roads, that’s when we get the questions. It’s mostly because you have folks walking on these roads and they’re looking at every little detail of that road. They can tell that it’s not the same as a hot mix or dense graded asphalt. That’s when they notice it. When you’re driving down the road you can’t see it or feel it. You can’t tell that it’s any different.”

Screen Shot 2016-02-15 at 7.17.22 PMPlacing a microsurface treatment on high-volume roads changes the esthetics of the mat, Turner explains, with more traffic improving its appearance within the first month of use. “The effectiveness of it doesn’t change one way or another, but from a public perception standpoint, I think it looks better on a high volume road,” he adds.

Public perception of microsurfacing has taken a hit from instances of improper placement, and also from the application being used as more of a temporary bandage. “Those roads needed much more than a microsurfacing or some other preservation treatment,” Turner says.

Turner’s point touches on a major concept of pavement preservation. A roadway in need of major work, or one that is failing, is not a good candidate for preservation work and requires more extensive rehabilitation. To paraphrase Marty Comer, the president of Comer Contracting in Connecticut, even in lieu of public opinion, preservation is a difficult concept for some municipalities to grasp.

“It’s a real tough sell,” he says. “Pavement preservation is for ‘good’ pavement, and to get people to spend money on good pavement is sometimes a challenge. In dealing with municipalities, it’s a tough sell when they have bad roads that need work and then they try and spend money on preservation work. That’s what the whole industry has been promoting for quite a number of years, but it’s still a tough sell.”

 

Contractor perspective

As in South Carolina, microsurfacing has emerged as the high-volume preservation of choice in Connecticut. And just like its southern counterpart, Connecticut faces a shortage of contractors to perform the task. Even as a pavement preservation specialist, most of Comer’s work is chip seal.

But, much of the preservation work in the state has been handled a different way. Connecticut has seen a strong run of resurfacing work over the past few years, with the state’s Department of Transportation recently reporting 2015 as the fourth straight year of increased two-lane road resurfacing.

“There was a lot of bituminous concrete (asphalt) put down last year as far as historical amounts, and they plan to do a fair amount this year,” Comer says. “ConnDOT has a tendency to call that pavement preservation, especially if it’s thin lift, because the paving industry has tried to make that the pavement preservation of choice.“

“The public will, to a certain extent, accept cape seal in this area with chip seal and microsurfacing over it,” he adds. “They still turn their nose up at it a little bit, but it’s perceived as more acceptable because it’s smoother. “

“The name of the game in any surfacing project is to avoid having loose stone. For instance, if you’re going to chip seal, it needs to be swept practically the same day. That’s where I think it’s going, at least where I’m working. The motoring public doesn’t accept chip seal well, but if you can make it smoother, if you can sweep it up real quick, then the pavement maintenance industry can have more success. You certainly have to be neat and produce a good looking product.”

 

– See more at: http://www.equipmentworld.com/high-volume-pavement-preservation-untapped-potential-for-contractors/#sthash.N4fGzf4Z.dpuf

Pavement Management |Testimonial | Arapahoe

Jonathon Heese, APM Master, Arapahoe County, CO

Jon: Hi folks Jon Heese of Arapahoe County. I usually do blooper rolls for Blair; I was hoping to make an exception this time [laughter]. So we brought the Barnhardt Group and last year and got them to a evaluate 25% of our roadway network, got that done and put into the StreetSaver® software. We’ve been doing pavement managing for a long time, many years, we had a retirement and we thought this is a good time to look at our practices and take a close look at what we’ve been doing and see if we want to make changes. We ended up doing 25% of the network put it into StreetSaver® software, we liked what we saw so we went ahead and did the other 75% this year.

Blair is just wrapping up now today with us we’ve got the entire network, about 350 center lane miles of our network in the StreetSaver® software, and if you ever get a chance to work with the Barnhardt group, maybe on the last day you could talk Blair into sitting down with you like he did with us and going through all of the reports, that’s great. Real time, he will be there with you if your schedules work out and he can have that back-and-forth with him about what you’ve been doing and your decision tree and how the report comes out, all the various reports, how to get you to PCI that you want, and how much money it will take you to get all of those things. It’s a great opportunity if you get that chance, so we just did that, Blair is printing out his final report and we will be picking through that over the next several weeks.

Thumbs up if you get a chance to work with the Barnhardt group, I would recommend it even if you can’t work with the Barnhardt Group, I did read the book. If you get a chance to pick up the book, it’s free. Just email blair@ipma.co he will send you a free copy of the book [The Book on Better Roads, Saving Your Crumbling Roads with Practical Pavement Management], definitely worth reading, maybe give you some ideas that you haven’t thought of. That’s it for me, Blair, nice to talk to you folks.

As the Author of the Amazon #1 Best Seller, “The Book on Better Roads – Saving Your Crumbling Roads with Practical Pavement Management” I have witnessed the transformation of local agencies just like you as they save millions of dollars by treating the right roads, at the right time, with the right treatment, for the right reason and with the right contractor!  You see, I have been in YOUR shoes!  Back in 2005, I was thrown into the position of Public Works Director for the largest privatized City in America, the City of Sandy Springs!  To make matters worse, there was no tax revenue in the coffers when the City broke free from the County, so I had to quickly learn how to do MORE with LESS!

I promised myself back then that no local agency should ever have to struggle with maintaining their crumbling infrastructure.  So over the last decade our team has built an entire suite of pavement management products and services that could collectively save this great Country 2.5 Billion Dollars a YEAR!  Take advantage of my 3 decades of experience in the pioneering trenches of the pavement management, in place recycling and pavement preservation industry!  Our team is the leader in this industry and is the voice for all new innovation across the nation!  Want to start saving millions like our other learners and clients?

Call today:  404-316-9792 or email lori@thebarnhardtgroup.com

Pavement Management | Secret Sale | IPMA™

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THANK YOU TO THE 381 Pavement Professionals that OPTED-IN!

WOW, THAT WAS A CRAZY!!!!!

But, the OVERWHELMING response leads me to believe that I should offer a “SECOND CHANCE” bundle.  Almost as good ;~)

Limited to first 50 people and link will be disabled on Friday at Midnight!

Thank you SO much to ALL of our Pavement Management SUPERSTARS that are making a difference.

You know what roads, what time and what treatment and you are saving MILLIONS for your agency! 😉

I am offering IPMA Academy (CLICK HERE FOR SYLLABUS), 8 DVD Box set, The Book on Better Roads and The Unreleased Black Album for…..$$$$$$$$$$$

CLICK HERE TO SEE RIDICULOUSLY LOW PRICE!

Want to learn more about pavement management, in-place recycling, and pavement preservation? Do you feel like you’re setup for failure as an agency engineer with little or no money to spend on your roads?

Now GO GET THIS DEAL HERE!

Lori

IPMA ACADEMY

IPMA | SECRET SALE REVEALED | BARNHARDT

The doors to the Secret Sale open tomorrow but you’re going to miss out if you’re not on the Insider’s List.

Go here and get on the list ASAP!

The reason you want to do that is you’re about to have access to the craziest offer in the HISTORY of Pavement Management.

Seriously …you’re going to flip out over this 🙂

Get on the list here so you don’t miss out!

Blair Barnhardt, APM
The International Pavement Management Association

Author of the Amazon #1 Best Seller,
‘The Book on Better Roads’

click here

IPMA Academy | Accredited Pavement Managers | Testimonials Part 1

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Adelina Lowry, MD, APM

Q.  Name one thing you learned in the course that surprised you.

A.  I learned the criteria to quantify the range of impact of a pavement treatment on the PCI, based on the life span of the treatment
Q.  What two pieces of knowledge/tactics from the APM certification course are you most likely to use in your job?    

A.  More than two items:

•    Propose the paving coring at the project level to validate the road treatment recommended by the decision tree (PCI vs Treatment)

•    Propose a new pavement investment strategy:
* 20 % budget – pavement preservation
* 60 % budget – pavement rehabilitation
* 20 % budget – pavement reclamation/recycling
•    Evaluate the performance over time of the existing pilot samples of HA5 applied to sections of subdivision roads of different ages

Wayne McField, APM

Q.  Name one thing you learned in the course that surprised you.    

A.  MORE about FDR and pavement treatments and timing.

Q.  What two pieces of knowledge/tactics from the APM certification course are you most likely to use in your job?  

A.  All of it. It is very informative.

Jeremy Lucero, PE, APM

Q.  Name one thing you learned in the course that surprised you.  

A.  I was surprised to learn that lime could be used to mitigate the swell potential of clays.
Q.  What two pieces of knowledge/tactics from the APM certification course are you most likely to use in your job?    

A.  Lime as a swell mitigation technique and possibly cement in CIP.

Luis Padilla, APM

Q.  Name one thing you learned in the course that surprised you.    

A.  The fact that there are still so many out there that wont take action to make necessary improvements to their roadways.
Q.  What two pieces of knowledge/tactics from the APM certification course are you most likely to use in your job? 

A.  Application process/material usage and when

Brian Boder PE, APM

Q.  Name one thing you learned in the course that surprised you.    

A.  There are more tools in the proverbial tool bag than I expected.
Q.  What two pieces of knowledge/tactics from the APM certification course are you most likely to use in your job?  

A.  Managing pavements works and continue experimenting with different techniques and materials

Learn How to Use the Three Legged Stool™ System of
Pavement Management to Save Your Crumbling Roads…

http://www.ipmaacademy.com/

 

Flat Rate for Pavement Management: $278.77 per CLM for Counties and $324.77 per CLM for Cities

Hey !

Would you spend 3 cents per SY to save millions?

The Barnhardt Group will show you

EXACTLY how to do JUST THAT!

Flat Rate of:
 
$278.77 per CLM for Counties and
 
$324.77 per CLM for Cities

CLICK to See ENTIRE Scope of work HERE.

Wellington Kansas PM

Wellington Kansas PM

A recent press release shows one Agency paying up to $800 bucks per mile!  GEEZ!
 
CLICK HERE TO READ

Blair

P.S.  The first 3 Agencies in TX to sign up before January 1, 2016 will receive the first year of StreetSaver absolutely FREE!

P.S.S.  Those three Agencies will not even pay for migration from their current PM database!  UNBELIEVABLE!

P.S.S.S.  Small surcharge for PCC roads and random surveys less than entire network.  Nationwide, we will be charging one way mobilization.

P.S.S.S.S.  We give away two FREE scholarships to IPMA Academy & one 8 DVD box set.

The Heart-Wrenching Facts | SafetyCurve.com | There is A Solution

CLICK THE MANGLED TRUCK!

Help Save Your
City or County (or even family members)
from Fatal Crashes .

Deadly Roads NEED Safety Curve™

Deadly Roads NEED
Safety Curve™

SafetyCurve.com™

Here are the FACTS!

A recent study found the $217 billion dollar cost of deficient roadway conditions dwarfs the costs of other safety factors, including:  
$130 billion for_alcohol,
$97 billion for speeding,
or $60 billion for not wearing a safety belt.
 
The report concluded that roadway related crashes impose:
$20 billion in medical costs;
$46 billion in productivity costs;
$52 billion in property damage and other resource costs; and  $99 billion in quality of life costs.
 
This “tale of the tape” measures the value of pain, suffering, and loss of enjoyment of life by those injured or killed in crashes and their families.
 
Crashes linked to road conditions cost taxpayers over $12 billion every year.

Will you do more to save lives?

For SafetyCurve™, we will be accepting applications for treatment sections Nationwide on a FIRST come FIRST SERVE basis.
 
If YOU are interested and want to go to front of line call Lori at 404-953-013 or email: lori@safetycurve.com.

www.safetycurve.com

Reno County Commission Introduced to Pavement Management by The Barnhardt Group

Written By: John Green

The Hutchinson News

jgreen@hutchnews.com

A Georgia-based pavement management contractor currently doing assessment work in Wellington made a presentation to the Reno County Commission Tuesday on the benefits of having a pavement management system.

Reno County Public Works Director Dave McComb, who is interested in developing such a system for the county, invited Blair Barnhardt of The Barnhardt Group to the meeting.

There is no money in the current county budget to implement such a system, but McComb said he would like the commission to be prepared to make a decision on whether enter such a contract in advance of the 2017 budget.

The purpose and benefit of a pavement management system, Barnhardt explained, is identifying preservation work that can extend a road’s life, rather than rebuilding roads after they have deteriorated, which is a more cost effective use of public works dollars.

Barnhardt’s company takes core samples from identified roadways to determine their makeup, assesses existing conditions of the road surface and subsurface, and then identifies up to 20 “distressers” that are impacting the life and condition of the road.

He gets down on his hands and knees, for example, Barnhardt said, to measure the length, depth, and severity of cracks in the pavement.

From the data gathered on the roads, a software program then makes recommendations on which of various methods of preservation work would best extend the life of the road at the most economical cost.

Spending 2 to 3 cents per square yard on assessment, Barnhardt contended, can save $10 a square yard on maintenance. Once the management system is in place, he said, “using the right treatments in the right place at the right time” can stretch road dollars by at least twice as much. Moreover, the industry is developing new preservation methods all the time.

So, rather than spending $1 million per mile to replace a deteriorated road, the county might be able to spend the same amount on preserving 20-plus miles of road and, eventually, with saved dollars, replace that deteriorated road.

David Edwards, of GSI Engineering in Wichita, which has partnered with Barnhardt in assessing projects identified by the management system, joined Barnhardt at the meeting.

Edwards noted that using the system might require the commission to allow already deteriorating roadways, which are already resulting in complaint calls to the commission, to deteriorate further while they do work on roads that appear in good condition, which may be politically difficult.

“You save what you can save first, and do the really bad roads down the road,” he said.

The commission will be able to point to hard evidence from the system that the decisions are more economically efficient, he said.

McComb, already interested in pavement management, learned more at a recent “lunch and learn” event sponsored by The Barnhardt Group.

The county has a system in place to sand seal so many miles of road each year, and pave so many miles of arterial with a cold asphalt mix, McComb said. However, he was interested in seeing what could be done, for example, to preserve the work done on Yoder Road 10 years ago, rather than spending millions to mill and asphalt the road again in 5 years.

“How can we get the best bang for our buck?” he said.

McComb also expressed a desire to have a system in place for determining road project spending that will still be in place when he is gone.

Asked by Commissioner Brad Dillon how their fee would work, Barnhardt said it is based on a per-mile contract, but it could be spread over several years, done all at once for a discount, or on a not-to-exceed pro-rated basis.

Learn more about Blair Barnhardt and The Barnhardt Group at wwwdrivingamericaforbetterroads.  Or get the #1 Best Seller, “The Book on Better Roads” for FREE at http://www.thebookonbetterroads.com

Call The Barnhardt Group to schedule your free consult with Blair that could SAVE YOUR AGENCY MILLIONS!  404-361-9792 or email lori@thebarnhardtgroup.com .

More Roads, Less Money, Less Carbon Footprint: Graniterock IPMA™ Charter Members Spotlight

From Graniterock Tools Newsletter: