Pavement Manager | Tip of the Week

 

Screen Shot 2016-02-08 at 6.16.31 PMBlair: Hey guys, this is Blair with your IPMA tip of the week. It’s great to see the economy coming back to life and all these roads that we’ve shut down, pipe farms, and the 2007-2008 era, they’re about to be redone, but there’s one thing that’s very important that I want to cover today. Stick around, we’ll be right back.

Announcer: Time for the IPMA tip of the week – brought to you by IPMA Academy, the most comprehensive online certification program for pavement managers on this planet. Here’s your host, author of the Amazon #1 Best Seller – The Book on Better Roads, Blair Barnhardt. Listen in with Blair and his guests as they show you how to do more with more money and less carbon footprint. Let’s get started!

 

Blair: Okay, so, it’s amazing now. We see the robust economy happening and here I am out in the middle of the rain today doing some pavement managing in any city of America and on one side of the fence, we’ve got this great economy kicking and houses being built on spec again. I’m really happy to see that, don’t get me wrong. But the bottom line is that there are still remnants of the 2007-2008 bust with 100% financing , all that stuff. So we’ve got all of these 21-22 foot roads at the back end of these subdivisions that have not been topped yet. One thing I want to point out is that it’s so so important when you do get out here to do the topping on these roads, make sure that they’re clean. I just took a core here in this subdivision, I went to pull the core out and of course you can see this is the binder, the top of the binder, and look at that Georgia red clay here. The road was never clean properly to begin with, and of course when the topping mix goes on and we compact the top layer, it’s pretty hard to get tact to stick. We’re all taught that in school. Please make sure that not only do you go out and clear the dirt and sweep it with a good L-Gen sweeper and get it all good and clean, but cut back right away all that nasty weeds and whatnot. Make sure you spray those sides of the curb and gutter, asphalt binder surfaces, with some Round Up.

 

Now, what I’ve done in this particular pavement management project here for the city of anywhere in America, is I’ve made a note here and I’ll read the note to you. Excuse my writing today, as I’m trying to keep everything dry and write while it’s wet. But I made a note here that I”m on a section, so I decided the section to 1426 feet long, predominantly it’s still binder and it’s about to be topped. Probably when the builder builds another 10-12 houses here, he’ll come up with the money to top this out. Make sure the road is good and clean and I said make sure road is sprayed with Round Up as well, and clean before topping. A lot of these roads are going to be too far gone. Make sure the builder doesn’t leave you a stinker. This is a good 3, 2.5in binder mix here. It’s going to be a pretty good base. I don’t see any truck traffic going through here. It’s just a dead end, cul de sac to cul de sac and a short cul de sac in behind me here. The point I’m trying to make is if it is too far gone, get in there and take advice from my buddy Tim at County Versailles in Georgia, what he taught me very early when I moved on to USA is before he gave the bond money back to the builder, if that road was tore up from the logging trucks, he made them do FDR a full depth reclamation with foamed asphalt cement, then top it. And once the road was up to his specification, the 6 inches of foamed asphalt base and inch and a half of top, then he gave them the bond money back and accepted the road on behalf of the county. So think about that. You’ve got hot in place, you’ve got cold in place. If it’s a small subdivision, you might as well just redo it with a small pulverizer and be done with it. You can’t get hot in place and cold in place trains to come in and do anything less than 20 or 30 or 40,000 square yards.

 

Think about those treatments on your binder asphalt as you bring Elvis back from the dead and recoup these valuable assets, these subdivisions that are built out of pipe farms that we saw from 2008 finally getting a chance to have life breathed into them. I’m sure people that had the houses from way back are real happy to have the new houses. It’s kind of strange when you see the new houses going in 10 years after the old houses, even the architectural style has changed. This is Blair with your IPMA tip of the week, 404-316-9792 if you need help with your pavement manager, give me a call. See you next time, thanks!

 

And I do want to point out one of our corporate sponsors here, this episode is sponsored by IPMA Academy – the world’s most comprehensive online learning platform for all things in place asphalt recycling, pavement preservation, and pavement management if you’ve ever had the burning desire to learn how to do more with less while saving your valuable infrastructure. This works out to be like a 941% return on investment. A couple cents a square yard to do pavement management, you save $10 a square yard by paying for the right treatment of the right road at the right time for the right reason with the right contractor. So thanks again to our corporate sponsor, IPMA Academy. More on that at http://www.ipmaacademy.com.

 

Announcer: Hey everyone, like what you just saw? Then you’ll love IPMA Academy! The most comprehensive online certification for pavement managers on this planet. Learn how to save your roads, and do more with less money and less carbon footprint. Head over to www.ipmaacademy.com for 3 free training videos. Thanks for watching!

 

Shelley Hansel: Hi I’m Shelley Hansel, the mayor of Wellington, Kansas. And we just had our first session with Blair Barnhardt of our pavement study. I have to say, it is probably the best money we have ever spent, as far as I’m concerned, in the city of Wellington. We now have a progressive roadmap, so to speak, of what we can do to improve the streets of our community. Without the Barnhardt group, we would just be fixing things willy nilly. But now we know what’s priority and what isn’t, and how to move forward and save our city money. I’m going to tell you right now, the Barnhardt group is the best decision you’ll ever make. It’s a progressive way for your city to move forward and have better streets, and happier citizens.

 

John Heese: Hi Folks, John Heese for Apple County. I usually do blooper rolls for Blair, I was hoping to make an exception this time. We brought the Barnhardt Group in last year, had them evaluate 25% of our overall network, had that done, put in street saver software. We’ve been doing pavement management for a long time, many years. We had a retirement and we thought this is a good time to look at our practices, take a close look at what we’ve been doing and see if we want to make changes. So we ended up doing 25% of the network, put it in the street saver software, we liked what we saw so we went ahead and did the other 75% this year. Blair is just wrapping up now today. With us we have the entire network, about 357 wide miles of our network in the street saver software. If you ever get a chance to work with the Barnhardt group, maybe on the last day you can talk Blair into sitting down with you like he did with us and going through all the reports. Real time, he’ll be there with you if your schedules work out, and you can have that back and fourth with him about what you’ve been doing and your decision tree and how all the various reports come out, how to get you to the PCI you want, and how much money it will take, all those good thigns. That’s a great opportunity if you get that chance. So we did that. Blair’s printing out his final report and we’ll be picking through that over the next several weeks and days. But yet, thumbs up if you get a chance to work with the Barnhardt group, I’d recommend it. Even if you can’t work with the Barnhardt group, I did read the book. If you get a chance to pick up the book it’s free if you just email blair@ipma.co, he’ll send you a free copy of the book. Definitely worth reading, it’ll give you some ideas you haven’t thought of. So that’s it for me!

 

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Pavement Management Testimonial From Mayor Shelley Hansel

Wellington, KS Pavement Management Plan

Watch Full Video Here:

https://ipma-1.wistia.com/medias/qhnkp6yh9

And, here is the audio transcript:

Mayor Shelly Hansel, Wellington, KS

Shelly: Hi, I’m Shelly Hansel, the Mayor of Wellington, Kansas. And we just had our first session with Blair Barnhardt for our pavement study. We have to say; it is probably the best money that we have ever spent as far as I’m concerned in the city of Wellington. We now have a progressive roadmap so to speak of what we can do to improve the streets of our community. Without The Barnhardt Group, we would just be fixing things willy-nilly, but now we know what is a priority and what isn’t and how to move forward and save our city money. So I’m going to tell you right now, the Barnhardt group is the best decision you’ll ever make. It’s a progressive movement for your city to make move forward and have better streets and happier citizens.

As the Author of the Amazon #1 Best Seller, “The Book on Better Roads – Saving Your Crumbling Roads with Practical Pavement Management” I have witnessed the transformation of local agencies just like you as they save millions of dollars by treating the right roads, at the right time, with the right treatment, for the right reason and with the right contractor!  You see, I have been in YOUR shoes!  Back in 2005, I was thrown into the position of Public Works Director for the largest privatized City in America, the City of Sandy Springs!  To make matters worse, there was no tax revenue in the coffers when the City broke free from the County, so I had to quickly learn how to do MORE with LESS!

I promised myself back then that no local agency should ever have to struggle with maintaining their crumbling infrastructure.  So over the last decade our team has built an entire suite of pavement management products and services that could collectively save this great Country 2.5 Billion Dollars a YEAR!  Take advantage of my 3 decades of experience in the pioneering trenches of the pavement management, in place recycling and pavement preservation industry!  Our team is the leader in this industry and is the voice for all new innovation across the nation!  Want to start saving millions like our other learners and clients?

Call today:  404-316-9792 or email lori@thebarnhardtgroup.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

IPMA | SECRET SALE REVEALED | BARNHARDT

The doors to the Secret Sale open tomorrow but you’re going to miss out if you’re not on the Insider’s List.

Go here and get on the list ASAP!

The reason you want to do that is you’re about to have access to the craziest offer in the HISTORY of Pavement Management.

Seriously …you’re going to flip out over this 🙂

Get on the list here so you don’t miss out!

Blair Barnhardt, APM
The International Pavement Management Association

Author of the Amazon #1 Best Seller,
‘The Book on Better Roads’

click here

Pavement Management | Secret Sale | Blair Barnhardt

THIS IS BIG.


 

 

Looks like you’re not on the Insider’s List for the Secret Sale.

 

You need to act now.

 

The reason why is because this is the most generous, outlandish, and fun offer in the history of Pavement Management.

 

You’re getting a 76% discount on …HMMMMMM?

 

What is it? Why am I doing this? 76% off of what??

 

Well, you’ll just have to see here 😉

 

One thing I’ll tell you is that you won’t know unless you get on the Insider’s List here.

 

So …go here and get on it! Otherwise you’ll never know the answer (and you’ll miss out on the most awesome sale ever, period 🙂

Blair

 

P.S. Seriously. You’re going to enjoy this a lot. Get the full scoop here.

IPMA Academy | Accredited Pavement Managers | Testimonials Part 1

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Adelina Lowry, MD, APM

Q.  Name one thing you learned in the course that surprised you.

A.  I learned the criteria to quantify the range of impact of a pavement treatment on the PCI, based on the life span of the treatment
Q.  What two pieces of knowledge/tactics from the APM certification course are you most likely to use in your job?    

A.  More than two items:

•    Propose the paving coring at the project level to validate the road treatment recommended by the decision tree (PCI vs Treatment)

•    Propose a new pavement investment strategy:
* 20 % budget – pavement preservation
* 60 % budget – pavement rehabilitation
* 20 % budget – pavement reclamation/recycling
•    Evaluate the performance over time of the existing pilot samples of HA5 applied to sections of subdivision roads of different ages

Wayne McField, APM

Q.  Name one thing you learned in the course that surprised you.    

A.  MORE about FDR and pavement treatments and timing.

Q.  What two pieces of knowledge/tactics from the APM certification course are you most likely to use in your job?  

A.  All of it. It is very informative.

Jeremy Lucero, PE, APM

Q.  Name one thing you learned in the course that surprised you.  

A.  I was surprised to learn that lime could be used to mitigate the swell potential of clays.
Q.  What two pieces of knowledge/tactics from the APM certification course are you most likely to use in your job?    

A.  Lime as a swell mitigation technique and possibly cement in CIP.

Luis Padilla, APM

Q.  Name one thing you learned in the course that surprised you.    

A.  The fact that there are still so many out there that wont take action to make necessary improvements to their roadways.
Q.  What two pieces of knowledge/tactics from the APM certification course are you most likely to use in your job? 

A.  Application process/material usage and when

Brian Boder PE, APM

Q.  Name one thing you learned in the course that surprised you.    

A.  There are more tools in the proverbial tool bag than I expected.
Q.  What two pieces of knowledge/tactics from the APM certification course are you most likely to use in your job?  

A.  Managing pavements works and continue experimenting with different techniques and materials

Learn How to Use the Three Legged Stool™ System of
Pavement Management to Save Your Crumbling Roads…

http://www.ipmaacademy.com/

 

Flat Rate for Pavement Management: $278.77 per CLM for Counties and $324.77 per CLM for Cities

Hey !

Would you spend 3 cents per SY to save millions?

The Barnhardt Group will show you

EXACTLY how to do JUST THAT!

Flat Rate of:
 
$278.77 per CLM for Counties and
 
$324.77 per CLM for Cities

CLICK to See ENTIRE Scope of work HERE.

Wellington Kansas PM

Wellington Kansas PM

A recent press release shows one Agency paying up to $800 bucks per mile!  GEEZ!
 
CLICK HERE TO READ

Blair

P.S.  The first 3 Agencies in TX to sign up before January 1, 2016 will receive the first year of StreetSaver absolutely FREE!

P.S.S.  Those three Agencies will not even pay for migration from their current PM database!  UNBELIEVABLE!

P.S.S.S.  Small surcharge for PCC roads and random surveys less than entire network.  Nationwide, we will be charging one way mobilization.

P.S.S.S.S.  We give away two FREE scholarships to IPMA Academy & one 8 DVD box set.

The Heart-Wrenching Facts | SafetyCurve.com | There is A Solution

CLICK THE MANGLED TRUCK!

Help Save Your
City or County (or even family members)
from Fatal Crashes .

Deadly Roads NEED Safety Curve™

Deadly Roads NEED
Safety Curve™

SafetyCurve.com™

Here are the FACTS!

A recent study found the $217 billion dollar cost of deficient roadway conditions dwarfs the costs of other safety factors, including:  
$130 billion for_alcohol,
$97 billion for speeding,
or $60 billion for not wearing a safety belt.
 
The report concluded that roadway related crashes impose:
$20 billion in medical costs;
$46 billion in productivity costs;
$52 billion in property damage and other resource costs; and  $99 billion in quality of life costs.
 
This “tale of the tape” measures the value of pain, suffering, and loss of enjoyment of life by those injured or killed in crashes and their families.
 
Crashes linked to road conditions cost taxpayers over $12 billion every year.

Will you do more to save lives?

For SafetyCurve™, we will be accepting applications for treatment sections Nationwide on a FIRST come FIRST SERVE basis.
 
If YOU are interested and want to go to front of line call Lori at 404-953-013 or email: lori@safetycurve.com.

www.safetycurve.com

Reno County Commission Introduced to Pavement Management by The Barnhardt Group

Written By: John Green

The Hutchinson News

jgreen@hutchnews.com

A Georgia-based pavement management contractor currently doing assessment work in Wellington made a presentation to the Reno County Commission Tuesday on the benefits of having a pavement management system.

Reno County Public Works Director Dave McComb, who is interested in developing such a system for the county, invited Blair Barnhardt of The Barnhardt Group to the meeting.

There is no money in the current county budget to implement such a system, but McComb said he would like the commission to be prepared to make a decision on whether enter such a contract in advance of the 2017 budget.

The purpose and benefit of a pavement management system, Barnhardt explained, is identifying preservation work that can extend a road’s life, rather than rebuilding roads after they have deteriorated, which is a more cost effective use of public works dollars.

Barnhardt’s company takes core samples from identified roadways to determine their makeup, assesses existing conditions of the road surface and subsurface, and then identifies up to 20 “distressers” that are impacting the life and condition of the road.

He gets down on his hands and knees, for example, Barnhardt said, to measure the length, depth, and severity of cracks in the pavement.

From the data gathered on the roads, a software program then makes recommendations on which of various methods of preservation work would best extend the life of the road at the most economical cost.

Spending 2 to 3 cents per square yard on assessment, Barnhardt contended, can save $10 a square yard on maintenance. Once the management system is in place, he said, “using the right treatments in the right place at the right time” can stretch road dollars by at least twice as much. Moreover, the industry is developing new preservation methods all the time.

So, rather than spending $1 million per mile to replace a deteriorated road, the county might be able to spend the same amount on preserving 20-plus miles of road and, eventually, with saved dollars, replace that deteriorated road.

David Edwards, of GSI Engineering in Wichita, which has partnered with Barnhardt in assessing projects identified by the management system, joined Barnhardt at the meeting.

Edwards noted that using the system might require the commission to allow already deteriorating roadways, which are already resulting in complaint calls to the commission, to deteriorate further while they do work on roads that appear in good condition, which may be politically difficult.

“You save what you can save first, and do the really bad roads down the road,” he said.

The commission will be able to point to hard evidence from the system that the decisions are more economically efficient, he said.

McComb, already interested in pavement management, learned more at a recent “lunch and learn” event sponsored by The Barnhardt Group.

The county has a system in place to sand seal so many miles of road each year, and pave so many miles of arterial with a cold asphalt mix, McComb said. However, he was interested in seeing what could be done, for example, to preserve the work done on Yoder Road 10 years ago, rather than spending millions to mill and asphalt the road again in 5 years.

“How can we get the best bang for our buck?” he said.

McComb also expressed a desire to have a system in place for determining road project spending that will still be in place when he is gone.

Asked by Commissioner Brad Dillon how their fee would work, Barnhardt said it is based on a per-mile contract, but it could be spread over several years, done all at once for a discount, or on a not-to-exceed pro-rated basis.

Learn more about Blair Barnhardt and The Barnhardt Group at wwwdrivingamericaforbetterroads.  Or get the #1 Best Seller, “The Book on Better Roads” for FREE at http://www.thebookonbetterroads.com

Call The Barnhardt Group to schedule your free consult with Blair that could SAVE YOUR AGENCY MILLIONS!  404-361-9792 or email lori@thebarnhardtgroup.com .

More Roads, Less Money, Less Carbon Footprint: Graniterock IPMA™ Charter Members Spotlight

From Graniterock Tools Newsletter:

Hot-in-place tests high, saves cash | IPMA™ Charter Member

We are SO proud of our IPMA™ Charter Members, Dustrol, Inc.

Way to go Brian!  I found this is “The Kansan”…

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By Nicolas Wahl
Newton Kansan

Posted Sep. 25, 2015 at 12:01 AM

An alternative roadway reparation technique utilized by the Harvey County Road and Bridge Department to save on costs has earned star marks after a recent round of testing.Over the past year the county has contracted out 19.3 miles of paved road to Dustrol Inc., Towanda, to be resurfaced using Dustrol’s hot-in-place recycling technique rather than a traditional surface overlay.

“What they decided to implement this year that they didn’t last year was a profilograph,” said Jim Meier, road and bridge superintendent for the county. “What the machine does is reads the defects in a road.”

The definition of a defect is any imperfection measuring 4/10 of an inch bump over 528 feet of roadway.The company administered the test on five miles of a recently completed stretch of East First Street starting at Rock Road and extending to the western border of Butler County.

“They read the results before and after (the work).” Meier said. “The before was a total of 361 defects on East First. When they took the profilograph back over that when they were done they had zero.”

Meier said the process cost the county just more than $1.5 million. He said that number is about 65-percent of the cost of a traditional two-inch overlay over the same mileage.

“Along with what else a two-inch overlay does is it raises the road,” Meier said. “Over time you actually narrow the road. The hot-in-place takes the existing two inches of pavement, in this case, picks it up and rejuvenates the aggregate.”

The fresh asphalt is then put back where it originally came from in a single operation requiring about 1,000 feet of equipment.

“We do still have roads that this is not a viable solution for,” Meier said. “Those roads will still get an overlay.”

Meier said while not a catchall solution for the resurfacing of county roads, he hopes to use the hot-in-place process as an ongoing solution for a significant portion of county mileage.